BY THE LIGHT OF THE MOON Review

By the Light of the Moon - Dean Koontz

Jilly and Dylan are strangers who are both knocked unconscious and injected with a strange substance by a scientist they refer to as Doctor Frankenstein. This chance encounter brings the two together, and they (with Dylan’s autistic brother Shep in tow) are off for a high-stakes adventure as they discover the depths of the supernatural powers they have been granted, and just why this happened to them of all people.

 

Look, this book is cheesy as hell. It’s Dean Koontz in full-on goofy mode. The prose is as purple as a corpse in rigor; Jilly and Dylan are pious pissholes who spend most of the book bemoaning the fact that they are so pure, so moralistic, in a world gone to hell. And Jilly is a take-no-crap comedian: the reader is reminded of this on every other page.

 

So why the four stars? Well . . . I had fun. I had a lot of fun. The mystery at the core of this story is one of Koontz’s most intriguing — who is the strange man with the needle, what is it he created, and why does it alter its victims so drastically? The narrative takes place over twenty-four hours, and the pace never lets up. Koontz doesn’t ramble too much here, but when it does it isn’t as much of a chore to read as it is in some of his latter day releases. I didn’t want to put this book down once I’d begun it, if that says anything.

 

This is a Koontz novel. You know what you’re getting. If you’re looking for a bit of brainless, cheesy fun with lots of gun action and wonky science, you could do much worse.